A healthy human eye thanks to a sleep apnea dentist
The Hidden Eye Danger of Sleep Apnea
December 31, 2019
Photo of Sleep Apnea CPAP mask, hose, headgear, and machine
Toronto firefighters no longer allowed CPAP machines at work
May 6, 2020
Show all

Defend your oral device against infections

ProSomnus Dental Sleep Apnea Applicance

Sleep is a vital component of every person’s health and well-being, especially for sleep apnea patients using an oral device to get adequate sleep. We recently received questions from patients about the safeguards one can take to properly disinfect their device and how to avoid potential misuse that could damage the device. To help clarify how to use the device properly and prevent damage to the device we have put together this resource so users can wear their device every night with confidence.

FAQ

  1. Should I be concerned about handling the device with my hands?
    You can insert or remove your device with your hands, but make sure to wash your hands thoroughly beforehand for at least 20 seconds. You can find the video about handwashing from CDC on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d914EnpU4Fo.
  2. Can I disinfect the device with alcohol?
    No, do not use alcohol on the device. Alcohol is a drying agent and can damage the material of your device, making it more susceptible to cracks. We also advise against putting your device in the microwave or heating it to “sterilize” it as this will only damage the device.
  3. Can I keep the device in the water?
    Whether you store your device in water or not depends on your device. Check your box for instructions. Most oral devices should be stored in a dry area that exposed to air and sunlight to prevent the growth of germs.
  4. Should I be concerned about the hygiene of the device if I left it exposed to open air?
    Washing your hands before inserting or removing your oral device, as well as properly cleaning and storing the device would prevent such contamination. According to the CDC, the virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person, either between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet) or through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Click here to download a printable version of this post.